Are you a victim of
cyberfraud?

Canadians have lost over

$7.2 Million

from COVID-19 related fraud

The Fraud Book will help you identify potential threats and give you the knowledge needed to stop cyberfraud before it happens!

Click below to follow the cyberfraud tree and figure out what kind of cyberfraud you are a victim of!

The Tree of Cyberfraud

Play through the presentation to see the various roots and fruits of cyberfraud, or zoom in where you want to see how different types of cyberfraud are connected!

Check out some recent videos of Claudiu Popa, author of The Canadian Cyberfraud Handbook!

Have you or someone you know been a victim of cyberfraud?

Consider contacting the agencies below for help, or report your story to a media outlet listed below.

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There are generally two kinds of cyberfraud.

In the first, you are actively, knowingly giving something to someone, usually after they have asked you. This could be a stranger on the Internet asking you for money or you offering money or personal information in exchange for something.

In the second, something is being taken from you without your knowledge; you are unwittingly giving something away. This kind of cyberfraud often involves malware and spam.

Are you knowingly giving something away?

If you knowingly give something away, it is usually under one of two circumstances.

In the first, you have purchased goods or services online believing them to be real. This may include health services, goods on online retailers, show tickets, and real estate.

In the second, you are giving either money or personal information in exchange for a future benefit or to prevent a future problem.

ARE YOU PURCHASING GOODS OR SERVICES ONLINE?

If you did not knowingly give something away, then it is likely that you are a victim of one of three types of cyberfraud.

If you were sent something to open, whether it be an email from a friend or stranger, an advertisment on a website, or a suspicious download, then you may be a victm of spam or malware fraud.

If there has been suspicious activity on your bank statement, then you may be a victim of debit/credit card fraud.

CLICK ON EACH TYPE OF FRAUD TO LEARN MORE!

 

 

If you purchased goods or services online, then you may be a victim of health care fraud or e-commerce fraud.

 

CLICK ON EACH TYPE OF FRAUD TO LEARN MORE!

Even if you have not purchased goods or services online, you may have given something away either to receive a future benefit or to prevent future problems.

A future benefit may be a promise of friendship or love, a job, or money.

Preventing a future problem may include stopping possible band fraud, future fraudulent activity on an account, or avoiding the consequences of overdue taxes.

ARE YOU PROMISED A FUTURE BENEFIT OR THE PREVENTION OF A FUTURE PROBLEM?

Some future benefits you may be offered include jobs in the form of legitimate-looking job offers or elaborate pyramid or ponzi schemes, relationships, or money.

WHICH OF THE ABOVE ARE YOU BEING OFFERED?

 

 

When you are given the chance to prevent a future problem from happening, you will either be asked to give someone money or personal information.

 

WHAT ARE YOU GIVING AWAY?

 

When you are asked to give away money, it is likely a bank investigator scheme, in which someone approaches you saying they are conducting a criminal investigation of your bank, or it is fake victim fraud, in which someone is pretending to be sick and asking for donations.

CLICK ON EACH TYPE OF FRAUD TO LEARN MORE!

If you did not knowingly give something away, then it is likely that you are a victim of one of three types of cyberfraud.

If you were sent something to open, whether it be an email from a friend or stranger, an advertisment on a website, or a suspicious download, then you may be a victm of spam or malware fraud.

If there has been suspicious activity on your bank statement, then you may be a victim of debit/credit card fraud.

CLICK ON EACH TYPE OF FRAUD TO LEARN MORE!